Little Zen One Babywearing Shop Review and Promo Code

The one thing that keeps me coming back to a store whose products I can buy elsewhere is customer service. In the age of Amazon, I want all my shopping experiences to be easy, seamless and pleasant. Allie, founder and owner of Little Zen One offers all this and more. Her website makes it simple to find and view exactly what you're looking for and the online checkout process makes handing over all your money to buy allll the wraps a breeze. Plus, her shipping times are fast and she sends you several status updates on your package.

My favourite thing about buying through her is that she makes herself available to answer all my questions, from laundering, to wrapping techniques, to how to get a wrap hemmed because the one I bought was too long. Allie is there for you via messaging through her site, Facebook messenger, instagram direct messages and her fun Facebook group, Little Zen One Chatter.

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9 Things to Love about Huggaloops Baby Carrier | A Review

 The Huggaloops Wrap-Free Baby Wrap was the first baby product I bought before my daughter was born, and it's still one of my favourites. I bought almost nothing baby-related when I was pregnant, but when this went on sale at my local baby store, I knew I needed to snatch one up. I'd done a lot of research on the benefits of babywearing and had painstakingly decided that the Huggaloops would be the perfect carrier for me to start with. This was one piece of gear I knew I'd use a lot and I wanted to practice using it before the baby arrived, because I didn't trust that my addled postpartum brain would be able to figure it out as soon as I was ready to start babywearing.

It's considered a stretchy wrap, which means it's made of soft, stretchy material. It's meant to be used for front and hip carries (with no option to back carry or have baby facing out) and requires three passes of fabric to go over your baby in order to ensure that she stays snug and secure against your body. Unlike traditional stretchy wraps, which are typically a long piece of stretchy fabric that you wrap and tie around yourself and your baby, the Huggaloops is composed of three interconnected loops of stretchy fabric that you put on before putting your baby in. Once Girly made her appearance, it was the first carrier I wore her in and it didn't disappoint. Plus, the prenatal practice majorly helped and I was able to get her in quickly and easily.

I always knew I'd want to babywear, but once I experienced just how incredible it was, I wanted to try ALL the carriers and over the past 10 months I've amassed quite the collection. But even as I've fallen in love with other kinds of wraps and carriers, I never fell out of love with my Huggaloops. And while I have several different woven wraps, I've never even tried a standard stretchy wrap, because anything they can do, my Huggaloops(es!) can do better. I was thrilled when Huggaloops offered me a carrier in exchange for a review* -- I'll never pass up an opportunity to talk/write about babywearing or get a new carrier! Oh Huggaloops, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways...

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"Why I Nurse in Public -- And You Can Too" -- Published at Hevria

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Since I was a little girl, I knew I intended to breastfeed my future babies. My grandmother had done it, my mom had done it, my aunt had done it, my mother’s friends and the women I’d babysat for in high school had done it. It seemed straightforward enough and easier than making and then washing formula bottles. Plus, you can’t forget your boobs at home, a major pro for me because I was absentminded even before mommy brain took over.

The only glitch in this pre-baby fantasy of an easy, convenient, earth-goddessy breastfeeding experience was that I wasn’t sure how breastfeeding while out in the world worked. Did it work? I mean, you have the baby, you have the boobs, and (because this is fantasy-land), the baby latches on like a pro, no pain or coercion required. But… didn’t that require exposure? Or one of those claustrophobic-looking, tent-like nursing covers I’d seen in the baby store where my friend worked? Nursing seemed natural enough, but nursing under a tent? Not so much. Still, I imagined I wouldn’t be able to just whip my breasts out either… I mean, I’m frum! I’d never seen a frum woman nurse in public without being all covered up in a blanket or running off to find somewhere private. Actually, I hadn’t seen much nursing at all.

Continue reading at Hevria -->

"I'm Still Here" -- Published on the TDF Blog

As I gathered up all the strength I had (and some strength I didn’t know I had) to push my baby out and into the world, all eyes were on me. Every person in the room offered some kind of support and encouragement. After one hundred minutes, I finally gave one last push.

And just like that, my firstborn child shot out into the world.

And just like that, it wasn’t about me anymore.

Three pediatricians and one midwife got busy suctioning out my baby. The other midwife tended to the status of my placenta. My mother had just become a grandmother and my husband had just become a father and they moved from my bedside to the warmer.

It was, in a way, a perfect segue into motherhood — the world no longer revolved around me, it revolved around my baby. But also, I was still there, freaking out on the hospital bed where my body had just erupted and my life had just transformed forever.

Continue reading at the Toronto Family Doulas Blog -->

7 Pregnancy Must-Haves to Make it Through Nine Months in One Piece

I’m still ambivalent about posting about this whole pregnancy thing, but I figure now that the bump’s out of the bag, I might as well write something to help make pregnancy a smidgen easier for someone else going through the miracle of temporarily having your internal organs reorganized. Because, seriously, miracle that it is and immensely grateful as I am, everyone knows that pregnancy is no five course meal at a fancy restaurant — in fact, it’s a lot more like steering clear of all restaurants, kitchens and places where people congregate to eat for the first several dreadful months, because where there is food, there are food smells and where there are food smells, there is nausea. It’s just science. 

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